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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
, is profoundly stuck. the u.k. has been put on negative watch on three largest credit rating agencies. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate about whether the u.k. should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city for a speech at the manhattan institute. >> i did that last night and had some meetings on wall street, seeing them there later. >> rose: so what's your message about the british economy to manhattan institute as well as the mayor and wall street? >> well, the basic message is britain is open for business. if you want to come and invest in a country that is dealing with its problems, cutting its business taxes, providing opportunities for companys to go britain is the place. i think we're doing better. >> rose:
force the u.k. government to make payouts of the payout over the space of three years. beatings, threat, sleep depravation, sexual humiliation say amount to systematic torture. >> you have to be very careful before you start embarking on anything that might turn into torture. the question is, of course, whether sleep depravation, whether food depravation, water depravation whether putting somebody in a cell without any access to any light or ability to exercise, well, is this torture? it doesn't take much of that to constitute torture. >> britain's ministry of defense while acknowledging the payouts assures that it wasn't anything but a few. the vast majority he said have acted with dignity. we seek to ensure that those responsible are brought to justice [beep] -- brought to justice. [beep]. [beep]. >> but it's starting to cost the u.k. government a lot of money. >> $3 million have been paid out. that's an average about 114. with almost two -- 200 cases the ministry of defense is likely to get bigger. there are the 700 or so individuals that could be filing claims in 2013. >> still ahea
, if you look at uk they have a culture of violent games, the same games and everything around. obviously, they don't have these same shoot problems. if you like at japan, they have the most vicious, violent video games of anybody, and they don't have these issues. they don't have a murder rate. >> guess what? tell your hollywood friends, we got hundreds of millions of guns on the street. we ain't japan, so you fight the war on the battlefield before you and the battlefield before us is there is easy access to guns. there will be easy access to guns regardless of what gun safety legislation. >> to parents while i still have control, because you lose it as they get older, don't let them do it. find something else. it's hard. it's easier said than done because a lot of kids sit there for hours and it's their baby-sitter, but no. >> steve, i understand that's not your position, but i'm hearing this a lot of from people in hollywood. no response. quentin tarantino was unbelievable incense it actisen. what a total jackass. left wingers say i want to -- there's a slippery slope on first amendme
. >> what would happen at 11:11 this morning uk time when the cycle was due to end? with the world and as well? no was the answer. live television coverage of the mayan heartland in mexico continued uninterrupted except for a poorly timed phone call. if they were disappointed by the anticlimax in this french town, it did not show. the local mountain was supposed to be a safe haven as the world ended with aliens poised to with the believers to safety. the aliens never turned up -- at least not the real ones. >> it is not the end of the world, but that does bring to this program to a close. for the next week and a half, you will continue to get all the day's news from our colleagues in london, and we will be back on january 2. until then, have a wonderful holiday season. we will see you in 2013. >> make sense of international news. bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by -- the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu newman's own foundation and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry
by the inquiry? >> it couldn't really be worse if you're one of the tabloid papers in the uk. it's 2,000 pages long. the press behavior is described as outrageous. says that editors disregarded their own code of conduct. he does make a point there are other papers. the guardian mile home broke the story. if you're at the end of the british press in what we call the red top tabloids this is a pretty uncomfortable report. >> all 2,000 pages of it. wasn't it partial vindication because the findings were he didn't know about the phone hacking or know about any cover up? >> yeah. this is good in terms of his news core business. there's all kinds of bits of legislation that can get you into trouble over here if you're implicated in what might be a corrupt or illegal practice in the uk or any other territory. >> at the same time some of murdoch's former lieutenants are facing trouble. >> i think that's definitely true. i think nobody would dispute that. you have a number of senior editors awaiting trial. we've already had one journalist. his royal journalist when to jail for this in 2006. this is whe
looked at the trade deficit, we were, again, lagging and uke sucking popped water. there's a rising deficit stripping our gdp. >> and right now europe is in a relatively deep recession. we're still above water. lou: you jumped all over the punch line because you talk about things not making sense. folks, this is not making sense. i'm delighted because people have wealth left in the equities market, the bond market. how long will that be the case if we go over the cliff? >> won't be the case for long if we have a recession followed by a typical bear market. lou: how long to get to recession -- >> we can get there pretty quick. in fact, some of the down downdrafts are starting to form. we saw those in the q3 gdp numbers were sinking into @%ntraction. lou: 2.7 -- >> employment reports gnar november and december, not surprised if gains in private sector payrolls are well over 100,000 new jobs. lou: that would not be good. baseline at least, i think, for passable is 125. what's your judgment? >> about the same, okay, that's a c-minus grade, get a "c" if we hit 150. lou: might say a "d" l
in the uk, multiple sources say she took her own life and was found on the hospital premises this morning. they tried to revive her but unsuccessfully. the hospital interestingly said that they have been supporting her through this difficult time and telling us that she was having a tough time. we don't know exactly why or what else was going on in this woman's life. but it appears that she did commit suicide on the grounds of the hospital. anyone else who worked with her but people described as stunned, that the news is staggering. one of the things that this prank phone call really highlighted, aside from the fact that it was a breach of security, was the kindness and unsuspecting nature of both of the nurses who took the phone call. this nurse in question today was the one who originally took the call and then transferred it to the duchess of cambridge's ward. the hospital even said, you know what, these nurses are trained to care for patients, not trained to deal with journalistic trickery. >> michelle, thank you. >>> talk about a major flip-flop from the senate majority. mitch mcconn
of these prank calls adora are there calls for regulation? >> well, i mean, in the u.k. we have governing body. if you want to do a call in this country you have to get written permission from the person you want to wind up to actually be allow the call to be broadcast and go on air. australia does have similar rules. i think the radio station definitely has broken some rules and i think we're going to have to it with a and see how that pans out in the next few weeks. >> thank you. royal watcher there i appreciate it thank you very much. >> thank you very much. >> we wish the duke and duchess the best. we debate you decide. is it voter fraud or voter suppression. mike huckabee our pal has advice for the president on how to avoid taking us over that damn fiscal cliff. marijuana is legal in washington, soon to be legal in colorado. wait until you see what they are selling. would gun control really have saved the life of the woman killed by her football-playing boyfriend? all coming up. with the spark cash card from capital one, olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] ola
, whether or not it's too big. let me finish. lloyd's bank of the uk controls 33% of the deposits in that country. in new york city alone, we have 170 banks chartered, yes, some very big ones. our banking system is not as consolidated as other parts. i'm fine with paying to it. but as a distraction from the key issues of competitiveness, jobs, all the things you just said. >> because if we are seeing real slippage or concern in terms of our competitiveness, aren't these, if you look at american companies, airporen't they maki profits, the big ones? how does that play into it? >> the companies are making profits, but most american companies now are very global. they have operations all around the world. >> their money is elsewhere. >> well, and part of the reason their money is elsewhere, because we've got a crazy tax system. we don't tax multinationals like anybody else. >> is that affecting our competitiveness? >> which countries around the world are you most worried about in your research as the real competitors? >> it's funny. we actually looked at where american companies were
uk's ms. pants? >> here is my feeling. i thought it was a practical decision because the fact that they were the people watching the five enemies he repeated and they were coming into redeye. as thinking, what these folks are not used to redeye in the first thing they see is the talking newspaper. so the idea was to do the talking paper later into the show, but then we just forgot about it. that's a funny thing about step is to forget. there's a lot of things i'm supposed to do, but i forgot. pagis mrna cause my closet probably dying. [laughter] >> i can't finance ducal missile from tokyo, japan. i love you. if better then going to a george michael's concert. [cheers and applause] >> way, nobody goes to the george michael's concert for the concert. they go for the after concert. >> can i get a backstage pass clerics anyway, -- >> every time about to say something i keep going, it's the reagan library. >> anyway, i'm a conservative quirky naturalist ear and i'm surrounded by lefties and it is hard to meet nice conservative man like yourself. i was wondering if you could start a
to do it. it needs u.s. and u.k. government approval as well. because they have nexen has significant assets in both nations. they also at the same time, canada approving a $5.25 billion deal proposed by malaysia petroleum in bid for progress energy. canada selling off assets to two state-owned entities. cnooc deal liable to get a little bit of attention here as well i'm sure, melissa. melissa: very much so. robert, thanks so much. >>> moving on we picked up on an interesting idea to solve the debt crisis. here it is. have the government mint two platinum coins and assign them a value of trillion dollars each. deposit the coins directly into the federal reserve, boom like magic we're $2 trillion away from hitting debt ceiling. under the current law this is perfectly legal. our "money" power panel is back to discuss. economist peter morici. jonathan hoenig from capitalist pig.com and ian shepherd son from pantheon macro advisors. guys, what do you think? this is serious idea out there being float the around. we have the peterson institute, they're a bunch of serious folks out there say
to answer as a result of the inquiry in the u.k. into press behavior as a result of the phone hacking scandal. it is 1 million pages long. tiny bits are important here in new york, because james murdoch, son of rupert and some people think heir to the huge empire, why he was so unethically engaged in what was going on? did he know who are more than he told us? he also asked why did the final editor of the news of the world before it shut down, why didn't he investigate more deeply into it? >> we have been losing a number of troops to suicide. rates are higher than they have ever been, approximately 18 veterans a day. the department of defense is taking a look at unifying sue site attempts. >> if there is an unsuccessful attempt. i would love to have you back on the show to talk about the really important issue. >> my thanks to daniel brian for the project. a.l. press, author of beautiful souls, saying no, a really fantastic book you should check out. thank you all for getting up. thank you for joining us today for "up." join us tomorrow sunday morning at 8:00 when i'll have connecticu
the the whole -- like a big-time democratic supporter who went to the u.k. [inaudible]. basically the u.s. wealthy are making their arrangements. they understand what's happening here. stuart: you realize both of us with british accents both of us talking about the americans. there's two americans right there. >> that's the american dream. anybody can get off the boat at ellis island and 48 hours later they are telling you americans everything what's wrong with your country. what a great country. charles: i think a lot of people step off the boat embrace what america is all about more than people who are actually born in this country. i think we keep complaining that the wealthy, on the buffett end, yeah they support obama because it helps their guilt and they could afford it. the other wealthy, the 250,000, they are stuck between a rock and a hard place. to mark's point, anyone out there who does not think that at some point we're going to come around 200,000, 150,000. stuart: hold on a second. under obama care the taxes which will pay for it go into effect on january 1st, three, four
risk on top of removing a cross like this which in many ways uk for insurance in the first place. that is something that the premium should cover. my fear is that if we see the same reaction with the gse is, it will result in the same outcome that you just referenced as a possibility and lenders will pull back on the crediting on their own. they have argued him so. they have risk concerns already associated with the portfolio that goes above and beyond the minimum that it requires. if we go too far, we reach a tipping point. and that tipping point will impact the communities that are referred to on the margin that leave the portfolio the most because there is no other financial system. so i think there will be a lot of response to some of the proposals, while at the same time trying to help with a reason to mitigate this. >> [inaudible question] >> yes, you know, there is also a line of where is fha and where should it be in line with other financial institutions. so that you're creating some common expectations. some of what we are proposing includes fraud, something that is mor
. and increasing the funding for the uk by over 25% a year. so they can help more firms build the capacity of overseas british chambers and maintain our country's position as the number one destination in europe for foreign investment. we are launching a new 1.5 billion pounds export finance facility to support the purchase of british export. [cheers] third, we are addressing the credit problems of companies we are providing it with 1 billion pounds of extra capital which will leave her either planning to help small firms and bring together existing ones. fourth, we are going to cut business taxes go further. let me tell you how. the temporary doubling of the small business rate relief scheme helps the small firms were 350,000 firms paying pay no right at all. the last government, we will end it in 2011, we have already extended its next april. and i extended by a further year to april 2014. we also confirmed the tax relief for our employees and shareholders. the energy bills provide renewable energy and we publish our gas strategy today to make sure that we make the best use of lower-cost
if any laws were broken. >> who knows what the laws in australia and u.k. are? when i listen to those ryan roses things and that's happening live. i don't think they're getting anybody's permission to do anything. >> gretchen: you're a standup comedienne as well. >> my comedy -- i'm not a mean comic. i think if i make fun of anybody, it's myself most of the time. and i think you never know how people going to react when you're cruel. my father always said this, you never know what's going on behind somebody's eyes. and you tonight. you don't know what they've come into a room with. so look, a million times we've predicted the end of iron glee this country. i don't think this is the end of anything in this country. there are always people who are willing to go to extremes to get a laugh. i hope people will consider the possibility of what the results might be. this is something that will probably never happen again. it is a unique, unusual, very singular occurrence. >> eric: you're going to be on "glee"? >> i'm going to be on "glee"! i'm super excited. ryan murphy is an incredible tale
at all? >> "24" and "homeland" are popular not just in germany and u.k. but in jordan and turkey. "24" is a huge hit in iran. it's beamed in illegally by -- you're not getting paid for it? >> no. but i do think. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. the actor is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking "homeland" in iran. >> it is stunningly popular but i've read a few criticisms of the show and to the extent that we make piss people off on every side of the aisle and are embraced by them too is a good thing. one thing i did learn is that as an export, as a public face, we do have some responsibility, some influence on -- this is an american export and we are good at this. we make really good movies and television shows. it is what the world sees of us. and there was a book by a researcher at the gallop organization and they polled people in egypt what is your feeling about americans. i don't like america but i like americans. and a very small percentage had never met an american. and they said how dow know and the answer was "friends". >> based on that i like amer
heard anything at all? >> "24" and "homeland" are popular not just in germany and u.k. but in jordan and turkey. "24" is a huge hit in iran. --s beamed in illegally by you're not getting paid for it? >> no. but i do think. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. the actor is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking "homeland" in iran. >> it is stunningly popular but i've read a few criticisms of the show and to the extent that we make piss people off on every side of the aisle and are embraced by them too is a good thing. one thing i did learn is that as an export, as a public face, we do have some responsibility, some influence on -- this is an american export and we are good at this. we make really good movies and television shows. it is what the world sees of us. and there was a book by a researcher at the gallop organization and they polled people in egypt what is your feeling about americans. i don't like america but i like americans. and a very small percentage had never met an american. and they said how dow know and the answer was "friends". >> based on that
when it came out almost two years ago. we said that the uk consolidation would fail. it had too much revenue. as we are seeing now, millionaires and billionaires are heading for the exit. that is what we are going to see. >> thank you. mr. chairman, i yield back. >> i would like to congratulate the chairman on his election and the fine work he has done as chairman of this committee and to congratulate mr. brady on being selected as his chair of this committee and the next congress. for our distinguished witnesses, they agreed that what we need to do is have a long-term solution. i would like to ask dr. zandi how we achieve that. we are several million dollars apart from the president's proposal. how would you close that gap? outline the president's proposal and speaker boehner's proposal. how can we get people employed and move our economy forward? >> i apologize. there will be a fair amount of numbers here. the president's tax revenue proposal amounts to about $1.6 trillion over a 10-year period. that is from higher tax rates. roughly 600 billion are from some kind of tax reform. th
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)